Crossbow - the magazine of the Bow Group

It is notable that the two most radical governments of the previous century, Labour after 1945 and Conservative after 1979, were both swept into power in the wake of the century’s two most severe economic downturns (and one ruinously expensive war) which provided both the stimulus to develop new ideas and the wider popular discontent with the status quo necessary to give a radical manifesto an electoral mandate.It seems likely that the economic slowdown will do more to reduce man’s impact on the environment than any number of Green MPs or MEPs. To read the full article by Mark Nicholson, download this edition of Crossbow Magazine...

With government intervention and rescue of banks comes added regulation. Many blame the hands-off approach in the US and UK that led to companies developing lax lending standards, but the problem here is two-fold. Not only has it become painfully obvious that governments have to maintain tight regulation in sectors including finance, but that those companies failed overwhelmingly to adequately assess their own risks and financial models.Download the magazine to read more...
Gordon Brown contributed significantly to the present crisis by building up deficits instead of surpluses when times were good, so we run the risk of government sowing the seeds of a future crises if irresponsible short term actions are taken now. What really matters is that, even in these difficult circumstances, we carefully build a responsible, long term economic policy.Download the magazine to read this article by Oliver Letwin in full... 
Since Britain’s fortunate departure from the Exchange RateMechanismin 1992, the economy has grown well. In no small part this was because of the 1980s supply side revolution, which concentrated on trade union control, tax reformand privatisation, and the 1990s macroeconomic reforms, based on inflation targeting and fiscal consolidation, which were implemented by Chancellor Norman Lamont and followed through by his successor Ken Clarke.Download the magazine to read the full article by Ruth Lea...
The 2008 presidential election will turn on national security just as the 2004 one did. Iraq remains the biggest dividing line between the two parties. Indeed, the past four years has seen this line become ever more distinct as Democratic support for the war has dripped away.Download the magazine to read the full article...
Perhaps the most exhausting month of the year, I find December strangely reassuring. You know what you are going to get; Christmas trees, carols, angels, shopping fatigue, overspend on your credit card and now it seems, stories that “Christmas is cancelled”..Download the magazine to read the full article by Sayeeda Warsi...
Every discussion of the future of the Lords seems to start from the same premise. Even the critics make no significant proposal for change in the role, powers or expectations of the House. For all the talk of reform, there’s scarcely ever a word of criticism of what the Lords actually do, or of the way in which they do it. On the contrary, indeed – the House is perceived as an unique and indispensable component of our democratic legislature.Download the magazine to read Geoffrey Howe's full article in this special 50th anniversary edition...
The great British institutions to which people gave their faith and trust have, in the last four or five decades, mostly declined from the positions they held. These would include organised religion; political movements and parties; the monarchy; trade unions; patriotic associations; even institutions like the family. All of these have declined in power, and above all in esteem.Download the magazine to read John Lloyd's article in full...
In my view the Tories have got it wrong again. They’ve chosen a new leader, who is talented and personable. He’s got hair and he’s got a certain sense of style. Labour will find it hard to portray him as a toff, in spite of his Eton provenance. He has an easy way with people and is engaging in a way that Gordon Brown, should he take over from Tony Blair, will find hard to match. Most important of all he has recognised that the Tory party has to change radically if it is to get back to power. He has made an almost immediate impact in the opinion polls.Read Anthony Giddens' full article on new Conservatism by downloading the full magazine...
There is a slight tendency when you're defeated in an election to think that the electorate have made a mistake and its the electorate who have got to change their mind next time. Whereas I think they get most elections right and its the party that has to change. It needs to change along the lines of social liberalism to get itself more in line with what society's like now. Which shouldn't be too difficult for a slightly old fashioned 1960's liberal like me.Read more by Ken Clarke by downloading the full magazine...

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